Categories
Commercial General information

Banner screw-up

Planning a party remotely can be perilous. My parents’ 50th anniversary was being celebrated in Vancouver, but I was doing all the preparations from my studio in Toronto.

I created a banner for my mom and dad’s party, which I would normally do with a trusted local printer.  But because I was flying,  I used on-line printing company Vistaprint and had them ship the finished banner to my parents’ house.

I wasn’t pleased with the customer experience: too small maximum upload size, no FTP option, and several pages of “buy this design on a mug” options to wade through before you can place the order. But the convenience seemed worth it.

Earl & Lilian Banner_ExtraLarge

When I arrived at their house, I could tell right away the tube was too small. I unrolled the banner to find that Vistaprint had sent me a banner for some sort of food bank charity event.

wrong-banner

Vistaprint has apologized and refunded my money:

I am very sorry to learn that you have received the incorrect banner. I can understand your disappointment since it is an important part of the decorations for your parents wedding anniversary. I assure you that this is not a typical Vistaprint experience . . .

. . . Please feel free to dispose of the incorrect banner at your convenience . . .

. . . Again, I truly apologize for any inconvenience caused and look forward to assisting you in the future.

The lesson to take from all this? Find a local printer you like and use them for any work you deem important!

Categories
Projects

Anniversary portrait

My mom and dad celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in March. My brothers and I threw a big party for them. My folks were skeptical whether anyone would come, but we had about 80 guests on a very rainy day in Vancouver.

Here’s the caricature I drew for the invitation:

Mom&dad heart-480px

Categories
General information Projects

Canal monsters’ glamour shots

Just before the actors hit the STRUTT runway, they are captured in full wearable art glory by photographer Brian Yungblut. Brian provides invaluable record of thousands of hours of work that shine for only a few minutes on show night. Below are photos of Swizzle Studio’s project, It Came from the Welland Canal.

You can see all of the wearable art here: http://www.yungblutphotography.com/Strutt2013/index.html

Eleven-foot tall canal monster
Eleven-foot tall canal monster
Tugboat escort for the canal monsters
Tugboat escort for the canal monsters
Vaudeville-style canal monsters
Vaudeville-style canal monsters